Category Archives: Photography in Fiction

Photography occurring as a subject in fiction.

Photography in Fiction: The Dickens Boy

The Dickens Boy (Thomas Keneally, 2020) fictionalises the true story of the early years of Edward Dickens (known as Plorn), Charles Dickens’ youngest son, in Australia.  It is set largely on the remote sheep station at Momba, Wilcannia, New South … Continue reading

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Photography in Fiction: The Photographer’s Wife

The Photographer’s Wife (Robert Sole, 1996) is set in the world of late 19th century Egypt.  Three things drive the narrative: the relationship between the photographer and his wife; her emergence as an increasingly creative photographer; and the colonial wrangling … Continue reading

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Photography in Fiction: My Parents’ Darkroom

The darkroom in the title of Reinhard Tenberg’s novel is a metaphorical one.  It is the mystery surrounding the activities of the parents of the narrator Jonas: his mother’s leading role in the BdM (Bund deutscher Madel – League of … Continue reading

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Photography in Fiction: Around the World in Eighty Days

Jules Verne was a writer of fiction about the frontiers of technology and its impact on society, rather than a science fiction writer.  Hence, Around the World is about the potential for the latest technologies in travel and communications to … Continue reading

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Photography in Fiction: The Tribe That Lost Its Head

Browsing through an old diary yesterday, I came across the following entry: ‘Nicholas Monsarrat has just introduced two female characters into The Tribe That Lost its Head, photographers named Clandestine Lebourget and Noblesse O’Toole, would you believe.’ (16th December 1976). … Continue reading

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